Saturday, August 15, 2015

a man with a boxing glove

                                                                             Attribution: Guerrino Boatto
Image: Pushed by Tender Forces (here)

A Shadorma is a non-rhyming 6-line poem
with a syllable count of 3/5/3/3/7/5

The Shadorma
flying fox
nocturnal creature
on the sly
in the dark
nibbling on fruits so quietly
just like human trait

A Joseph's Star is a non-rhyming 8-line
poem with syllable count of 1/3/5/7/7/5/3/1
written center-aligned to end up diamond shaped

The Joseph's Star
what
can it be
holding back the crowd
a man with a boxing glove
but why should it come to this
when pushed to the wall
he fights back
right?


For Jen's hosting at MLMM's B&P's Shadorma 
and Beyond - the Joseph's Star and
Mary's at PU's Poetry Pantry #265

26 comments:

  1. When push comes to shove, sometimes you have to fight back.

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  2. We can't win them all, but we can try

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  3. Both are well done! I can't imagine trying to make words fit into such requirements.

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  4. I'm not sure I completely follow the first poem but I definitely enjoyed the second one. Got me thinking.

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    1. Relating the analogy of some people 'nibbling' on other's assets on the quiet leaving a trail of 'heart-breaks'

      Hank

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  5. Like the comparison of the fox to human nature ;-)

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  6. There can be the subtle, slow eating away and the more explicit, physical conflict. Both need a reaction to preserve individual integrity. Interesting poems.

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  7. oh i love the first one best, its like giving us a riddle; I got it i got it the answer is: FRUIT BATS

    have a nice Sunday

    much love...

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  8. Love the way these two pieces sneak around until they get to the punch. And the forms are perfect for a sports theme, since it allows lovers and strangers alike to enjoy it.

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  9. interesting structures.. and interesting poems.

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  10. Ah, when pushed to the wall, what choice does he have?

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  11. Loved both the forms :D so intriguing!
    Well penned :D

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  12. very enjoyable lines...love them all...

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  13. i love boxing , and i can tell you that there is a lot of poetry in there

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  14. Maybe pushing someone against the wall is not the best way to avoid the words of fists.

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  15. Ah I like both these forms--3/5/7 seem to be great numbers for poetry

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  16. I love the idea of the flying fox nibbling on fruits.....

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  17. Now these were interesting forms new to me...love learning abut new things...and you created some wonderful poems Hank!

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  18. Sometimes we have to fight back.
    Great words Hank.
    Yvonne.

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  19. yes, fighting back is mandatory in some circumstances.

    enjoyed the first poem too - the observations are quite true

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  20. You know what they say a fox can be sly..

    I think sometimes in life we do have to fight back...depends on the circumstances..

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  21. I loved the Shadorma which told us how the flying fox survives by being sensible without making a show of finding food to eat. With the Joseph's star it is probably slightly better to punched with boxing glove than with a fist!

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  22. Like both of them and I am always interested in learning syllabic forms. Thank you,

    Elizabeth

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  23. Wonderfully executed style (both).
    ZQ

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  24. Great use of form the meanings carried well.

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  25. Both very well done -- but oh, that sneaky fox!

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