Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Belimbing

 Image:1 A bunch of belimbing on the tree in the backyard

 Image:2 Taken from another angle of the same tree. The flowers are seen on the right side, red in color

Image:3 A close up from another part of the tree. As can be seen the end is rounded but the five parts are still visible

Note: Smaller in size than a starfruit but rounded not star shaped. Measures about 6cm (2.5 inch) The tree in our backyard sprouted a generous offering which I snapped a week ago. Very sour, can be taken raw but not munched as a fruit. It is an appetizer taken together with meals. I've seen 3 types of preparations. The first is sambal where two of the fruits are pounded with chili and fish paste (or with anchovies instead of fish paste) Secondly a number of them are sliced in half and cooked with fish, coconut milk and a little cinnamon. Thirdly, it is dried and included as one of the items in an Indian pickles like, together with lime,carrots,cherries,olives and others. My mouth waters thinking about them!

Very much sour
Distant cousin of starfruit
Mixed with anchovies

And pounded chillies
Whets the appetite with meals
In place of chutney

Dash of cinnamon
With fish and coconut milk
Turned into a dish

Together with lime
Thrown in as one of items
To make mixed pickles

Submitted to d'Verse OpenlinkNights

21 comments:

  1. so it is good? might like it with the pounded chilis...sounds intriguing...its cool too that you use your verse to expose us to some pretty unique parts of your world...

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    1. Brian,
      We have sambal practically at most meals. It may not be belimbing as the sour element but other forms as well. It can be lime,fermented durian and lately even yogurt

      Hank

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  2. Nice backyard!

    Brian, I can testify it is good! :)

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    Replies
    1. oceangirl,
      We use belimbing in masak 'lemak cili api' with tenggiri. Taken with steaming hot rice at lunch, mak mertua lalu pun tak nampak.

      Hank

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  3. Fascinating. Well done with the pics!

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  4. This was so refreshing to read and the pictures were awesome congrats on a wonderful post.

    Yvonne.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Yvonne! Somehow color green stands out in pics.

      Hank

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  5. This makes me hungry, Hank. I enjoyed the pictures first, then your words...and now I want to try some!

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    Replies
    1. Mary,
      Make a bee-line to the East Ma'am!

      Hnak

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  6. Wow, never heard of these before, very informative. Thank you.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Tony,
      Appreciate your first visit! Welcome any time!

      Hank

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  7. I cower at sour
    It does not have the power
    To get me to eat
    I guess I have to forgo the pickle treat

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    Replies
    1. It' not really sour
      When taken with rice
      It's really an appetizer
      It's nice!

      Hank

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  8. I love how you make a poem of pickles--great use of your adjectives here, Hank. And I love that tree and its amazing-looking fruit. You always make me long to be able to grow these things, instead of the humdrum of the American great plains...beautifully exotic here, what is common for you.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Joy,
      We on the other hand would just love to see fluffy snow flakes or ride across the American plains if we can. We picture wild horses and bisons in the distance. We see apple trees,plums in your backyard...wow thanks to blogging!

      Hank

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  9. i'm a big fan of cooking as a metaphor, or just cooking in order to eat good food:) the images make for a tasty treat, and read.

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  10. My tongue is tingling to taste it ~ Yummy ~

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  11. Interesting post! Great pics and verse!

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