Sunday, April 26, 2015

W for Lots of Wise Words! (YH#11)

This is the Modern Day Explorer #11
The Modern Day Explorer #10 (here)

W for Lots of Wise Words

The human side of photography is a very personal thing. One just snaps without really thinking. But it is more than that. Let's get some inputs from Yusuf especially when out in the 'field'

SOME THOUGHTS ON STREET PHOTOGRAPHY
Yusuf Hashim says:
One aspect of street photography I dislike and would discourage is the tendency for newbies to zero in on beggars, the destitute and unfortunate people in the street, and call it street photography. Street photography is about life in the streets. Along with the beggars and the destitute and unfortunate homeless people on the street, there is happiness, emotions, surprises and unique photo-opportunities that we can shoot. IMHO, the essential difference between artists and photographers is this
.
An artist starts with a blank canvas. With his training in frame dynamics and colour theory from art school, he then proceeds to populate his blank canvas with his visual story. His subject placements is near perfect. And his knowledge of the power of light, shades, shadows and colour results in a beautiful painting (if he is good). An artist therefore ADDS elements into his blank canvas to make a picture.
                                                                                              Attribution: Yusuf Hashim
Image1: Yusuf Hashim says
I was having char or tea at a pavement tea stall in Kathmandu when this thirsty boy 
came up and asked the chai seller for some water. The Chai seller told him to open 
his mouth ....and simply poured water down his throat 

Photographers have a different challenge. As a photographer in the streets, we are surrounded by zillions of dynamic events going on around us all the time. We only need to train ourselves to see, to identify and to isolate a single event, choose a particular perspective that is uniquely ours, and press the shutter to freeze that unrepeatable single moment for eternity. We have to MYA (Move Your Ass) to try and EXCLUDE elements that we don't want in our frame. 

For example if you see that proverbial lamp post behind your subject, you have to MYA either to the left or to the right to prevent creating a photo which shows the lamp post growing out of your subject's head..
                                                                             
                                                                                             Attribution: Yusuf Hashim
Image2: Yusuf Hashim says:
One fine morning in Thamel, Kathmandu. It was early morning. Mother and daughters were brushing their teeth on the pavement, on a low wall, just outside their house. Behind them is a communal well, in a large square pit, with steps going down at least 30 meters. Many other women and children were washing clothes or washing themselves down in the pit. 

Early morning is a beautiful time for shooting photos. The almost horizontal light creates beautiful shadows and light, bringing out textures, shapes and patterns. I cannot believe that many so called photographers choose to sleep during this golden hour.

A Haiku
Always be ready
That special moment comes by
in just split seconds

For Blogging A to Z April Challenge - W

14 comments:

  1. Hank this was so exciting to read and most enjoyable. Great post for "W".
    Yvonne.

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  2. You just never know when a moment shall arise. Good to have a camera at the ready indeed

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  3. I love being able to capture life as it is living. Excellent article Hank.
    Can you believe we are at W???

    Moondustwriter

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  4. I love to read about photography but I don't do it anymore. Some
    great tips and photographs. I especially like the one of the boy drinking water.

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  5. He captured some wonderful shots. No, not good to have a lamp post growing out of someone's head.

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  6. A split second is all it takes. So true, Hank.

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  7. You never know when the perfect opportunity will present itself. Too bad, I am always fumbling for my camera and usually miss the spectacular, once in a life time shots. You've shown some really amazing photos in this post and I enjoyed the story behind them.

    Melissa Sugar
    Twitter: @msugar13
    sugarlaw13@live.com
    http://fictiontoolbox.blogspot.com

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  8. Wise advice to get that perfect shot

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  9. Beautiful photographs - thanks for sharing. Visiting for the A-Z blog challenge.

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  10. Wonderful Wise Words indeed! Great advice and point of view


    ALOHA from Honolulu,
    ComfortSpiral
    =^..^=

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  11. Just stopped by and really enjoyed this post. My husband used to love photography. I learned something from this post. Thank you Hank.

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  12. I am not much of a photographer, but I understand there is now software to assist with lampposts and such. I love these pictures and thank you Hank for introducing us to Yusuf. I will be back. (No I am not Arnold).

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    Replies
    1. So sweet of you Jo! Thanks for your visit. Glad you like them. For easier reference all of postings on Yusuf's will have his initials in the titles eg YH#1, YH#2 and so forth. Will certainly check out the software!

      Hank

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